Roles of Drop-in Centers in Street Children Interventions: Design Guidelines and Humanitarian Emergency Architecture Adaptations

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M.Sc. Ruba Azzam
Assoc. Prof. Dr. Karim Kesseiba
Assoc. Prof. Dr. Ahmed AbdelGhaffar
Dr. Mennat-Allah El-Husseiny

Abstract

For decades, numerous countries have been witnessing the Street Children phenomenon where millions of children worldwide are subjected to risks. Despite the crucial role of intermediate non-residential interventions - using drop-in centers- in protecting and rehabilitating street children, there is a paucity of research addressing the quality of design of these centers and how architecture might influence their operational process. Those observations invite investigating drop-in centers used in practice from a design perspective and question adapting architectural applications for humanitarian emergencies, focusing on “Child Friendly Spaces”. The study aims to provide solutions for better quality design, facilitating operational challenges. The methodology undertakes the investigation through primary and secondary axes. This involve conducting literature and international precedents review and secondarily, an Egyptian contextual first-hand documentation and qualitative analysis of selected centers.

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How to Cite
Azzam, R., Kesseiba, K. ., AbdelGhaffar, A., & El-Husseiny, M.-A. (2020). Roles of Drop-in Centers in Street Children Interventions: Design Guidelines and Humanitarian Emergency Architecture Adaptations. Journal of Contemporary Urban Affairs, 5(2), 1-18. https://doi.org/10.25034/ijcua.2021.v5n2-1
Section
Original Researches
Author Biographies

Assoc. Prof. Dr. Karim Kesseiba, Department of Architecture and Architectural Engineering and Building Technologies, Faculty of Engineering, Cairo University, Giza, Egypt

Karim Kesseiba, Architect and PhD, is Associate Professor at the Department of Architecture, Faculty of Engineering, Cairo University (Egypt). He is a Member of the Teaching Committee for Architectural Design Studios for Graduate and Undergraduate Programs, Faculty of Engineering. Mob. +20 100/000.34.31. E-mail: karimkesseiba@gmail.com

Assoc. Prof. Dr. Ahmed AbdelGhaffar, Department of Architecture and Architectural Engineering and Building Technologies, Faculty of Engineering, Cairo University, Giza, Egypt

Architect and PhD, is Associate Professor at the Department of Architecture, Faculty of Engineering, Cairo University (Egypt). Mob. +20 122/313.17.88. E-mail: amaghaffar@gmail.com

Dr. Mennat-Allah El-Husseiny, Department of Architecture and Architectural Engineering and Building Technologies, Faculty of Engineering, Cairo University, Giza, Egypt

Mennat-Allah El-Husseiny, Architect and PhD, is Assistant Professor at the Department of Architecture, Faculty of Engineering, Cairo University (Egypt). She is a Member of the Teaching Committee for the Double Masters Program: Revitalization of Historic City District, BTU- Cottbus- Cairo. Mob. +20 111/779.00.02. E-mail: mennatallahelhusseiny@gmail.com

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